Wednesday, June 12, 2013

Transitions take a lot of time it seems


I bought this mint tea in Ottawa.
It was inexpensive and for my dinner parties
it was always requested.
Just finished the box.
Mr. Husband has been drinking much mint tea lately. 
 
Here's the orange scarf that is for my
very cute godson.
His two older brothers will be DV
getting one also...
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Ravelry here.
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Seems that June 9, 1963 was
a popular day for clergy to marry 50 years ago:
Fr. Thomas Hopoko and his Matuska also!
I enjoyed listening to this podcast...
I think it is so important to hear from those who are
from a generation or two before me ~
it is really significant to understand what came before
and how it has been,
and what has really changed.
I appreciate Fr. Thomas Hopoko's practicality,
as it were,
in go to church, do your prayers, do your best...
Sometimes I find that we get so caught up in
realizing how imperfect we are that we
forget that there are really still things we can do
even if we are no 'giant' in anything what so ever.
I've been thinking that
part of growing up is realizing that
we are just plain folks and not superheros.
My spiritual father in Ottawa once told me that
humility is knowing oneself.
It seems to me that in the early years of my undergraduate
a lot of us really did not understand or know ourselves.
Actually I think it is hardly possible to even begin
without going to confession...
then...
it actually can get better.
*
I've been re-reading Norris' cloister walk
and somethings are actually becoming a bit more clear.
Her book had a tremendous impact on me
and was such an excitement to read,
back 13 years ago...
*
It is wonderful to revisit books like this;
it helps me in transitions also.
*
So...
would love to hear what books flipped your life upside down,
like Norris' did to mine
over the years.
What books you keep returning to...

2 comments:

Elizabeth @ The Garden Window said...

For the books, it would have to be first meeting Elizabeth Goudge's "The Dean's Watch", then Bishop Kallistos' "The Orthodox Church" then H V Morton's travel books.

Sara said...

It feels a bit like I have landed among kindred souls here . . . Elizabeth Goudge's novels had a giant impact on me, "The Dean's Watch" is probably my favorite of them all. How interesting to see it mentioned by Elizabeth. I keep lists of the books I have read, since 1986. Just finished Thomas Hopko's "The Lenten Spring", a re-read from a couple of months ago. And Alexander Schmemann's "For the Life of the World" is a recent find. Yes, I agree about Kathleen Norris too . . . read "Cloister Walk" about 7 years ago when I began searching for something deeper in my faith journey. So glad to have come across your blog, and I will visit again.